fbpx
Search
Close this search box.

CHARITY TO CHANGE

In partnership with the Lilly Endowment Inc., Leadership Foundations has developed Charity To Change, an innovative training program to work with churches and church collaboratives to reimagine how congregations can invest in long-term, systemic community change with the skills, knowledge, and tools essential to build closer connections with their local communities, to develop a better understanding of their socio-cultural context, and be responsive to their most pressing needs.

Active Online Learning

Charity To Change is delivered through a Learning Management System featuring world class theologians and community development experts.

In 9 units over 9 months, participants will access original and exclusive lectures, interviews, panel discussions, tools, a library of resources and activities through Leadership Foundations’ online platform.

Curriculum

  1. Seeing The City
  2. The Church and The City: An Historical Perspective
  3. Theology of Justice
  4. Incarnational Ministry: Scripture and Culture
  5. Engaging People of Good Faith and Goodwill
  6. Systems Thinking and Asset Mapping
  7. Faith And Work: Knowing Your Congregation
  8. A Church In And For The Community
  9. Models of Church Engagement

The faith community is a potential force for massive social change.

Churches possess a wealth of ideas, talent, and influence to deploy on behalf of the city.

Charity To Change seeks to help unleash congregations for action leading to lasting and sustainable change for the common good.

Chapter 1 Free Lesson Preview: Theology of The City With Dr. Ray Bakke

Play Video about Urban Church

Contact Us To Learn More

New Book Launch

City As Playground Anthology

 is now available for purchase in print and Kindle.

Celia Vigil

Communications Associate

What book, movie, quote, or tv show has most shaped your understanding of leadership or the city?   

A quote that has shaped my understanding of leadership and the city is, “Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world’s grief. Do justly now, love mercy now, walk humbly now. You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it.”

While the amount of work there is to do to transform cities is great, this quote reminds me that we are freed from having to complete it all, though our obligation to continue remains. We may never see a huge transformation in our lifetime. The work stretches far beyond us. However, this does not make our acts of faithfulness in the day to day less significant, no matter how small they may seem.